Deutsche Version
DRUMS & PERCUSSION

TABLA LESSONS

INFORMATION

 


TRIBAL MADAL

Pakhawaj | Mridangam | Dholak | Naal | Kachhi Dhol | Madga
Khol | Madal | Ghatam | Thavil | Ghungroos | Kanjira

For a more detailed and bigger size click on the thumbnail.
Unclear edges are merely the result of the image processing and not lack of good workmanship

MADAL TRIBAL

Madal Tribal
Madal Tribal
Madal Tribal
Madal Tribal
Madal Tribal
Madal Tribal
Madal Tribal
Madal Tribal

BASIC INFORMATION ON MADAL TRIBAL

The Madal is (like Dholak, Bhangra Dhol and Khol, see there) a popular folk drum from northern India. The Madal, however, comes in different designs. The Madal Tribal is the original instrument which was made by the Indian tribes. It is usually provided with a special white Gab paste over the whole surface of the big bass side (30 cm). The small black spot that can be seen in the image above is not the Gab but only decoration. This large Gab gives the drum the possibility of a good low bass sound. Traditionally, this special white clay Gab should be applied on both skins. Recently, though, the small skin (21 cm) is more and more produced with a large black Gab, as is customary for the Tabla. Underneath this black Gab, however, the traditional white Gab is still there. The white Gab in connection with the size produces a better, heavier, more sonorous and rounded sound, provided the manufacturer of the Madal is good.

The playing technique does not require a complicated fingering like in Tabla playing. It is easy to improvise on this traditional Madal. Some very few syllables have been handed down in traditional playing such as Dhitang, Dhei, Dhet, Tan, Did etc.


All prices include 19 % German sales tax.
Customers outside the European Common Market get a reduction of 19 %.

Please check with the Currency Converter how much this is in US Dollars or other currencies

The Madal is only available on client's request
The price depend on the time of order (around 120,00 Euro)

 

Ihr Warenkorb
MISCELLANEOUS

FORMS

TARANG WEBSITES